Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Explains How You Can Treat Inflamed Acne

Acne specialist, Rosemary Barclay, shares specific products that can help clear your face for good.

Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

There are many different types of acne, such as inflamed, cystic, non- inflamed acne, acne fulminans, and acne mechanical, each requiring a specific approach and treatment regimen. Each of these forms of acne is caused by different triggers which explain while treatment for all these diverse forms of acne using the same method will not bring success. Rosemary Barclay, owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains how to treat specific types of acne.

The first step is to identify the type of acne you have before treating your skin. Rosemary Barclay recommends visiting an acne specialist who can identify your specific type of acne. Using the right products will speed up the healing time of acne while preventing new ones from forming.

Mild Inflamed acne can be reduced significantly by Incorporating a consistent cleansing routine and just as you treat a sports inflammatory condition, ice can help but remember not to apply ice directly to the skin. Rosemary Barclay suggests wrapping a piece of ice in a paper towel and running it over the inflamed areas. She recommends focusing on exfoliation and the use of natural anti-inflammatory products.

Unclogging pores is made possible through exfoliation, the process of removing a build up of dead skin cells and extra oil. Acne prone individuals shed skin at a faster rate than others. An anaerobic environment is created in clogged pores that receive little to no oxygen, the perfect playground for bacteria. Continually exfoliating will help you prevent this issue and get your clogged pores under control.

Natural anti-inflammatory products will reduce the pain and swelling that goes hand in hand with inflamed acne.  For mild acne simply treating the skin with honey, manuka honey, in particular, relieves acne. Manuka honey contains a natural anti-bacterial and adding a few drops of tea tree oil to it can further alleviate inflammation.

Anti-bacterial products target special p. acne bacteria, which is responsible for inflammation. Again, Rosemary Barclay reminds acne prone individuals to take constant preventative measures, even when the skin starts to look better. Be on the lookout for acne-fighting ingredients like green tea, chamomile, lactic acid, benzoyl peroxide, and mandelic acid. Essential oils like sweet basil and holy basil also afford natural anti-inflammatory properties but these should never be used neat.

Using a consistent combination of all these product types has been shown to be very effective in treating inflamed acne. Beware of rubbing or scrubbing these products onto inflamed acne lesions, however, as this can cause larger breakouts and scars. Most of all remember not to over-treat the skin with harsh chemicals as this may, in turn, lead to dry skin and ultimately overproduction of sebum. If you deplete the skin of natural oils by over exfoliating it, the natural reaction will be to produce more oils! Limit exposure to the sun as the UV rays may cause hyperpigmentation of acne scars.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay - Cause of Acne Explained

The True Cause of Acne Explained by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme,CT

The first step to treating acne is to understand acne, and Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT explains three core causes.

Rosemary Barclay 1With such a plethora of information readily available on the internet, it’s easy to become confused about the root cause of acne. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., is an acne specialist, certified esthetician, and board-certified nutrition specialist. After many years of education and applied experience, Rosemary Barclay explains the true causes of acne.

While many different factors influence the severity of your breakouts, it’s important to understand that acne is a genetic condition. These hereditary genes determine the size of the pore, numbers of pores and additionally affect the way pores function. The result can be an overproduction of sebum, clogged pores, and unwanted pimples. Genetic conditions like acne can skip generations so you could be the only person in your immediate family with acne. Rosemary Barclay recommends looking outside of your immediate family to see if you can pinpoint which parent you inherited acne from, simply by observing aunts, uncles, and cousins. This will help you learn whether you are prone to cystic, inflamed or non-inflamed acne.

Skin sheds layers of dead cells with the average, non-acne prone person shedding 1 layer of skin cells every day. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT explains that someone with acne could actually shed up to 5 layers of dead skin cells per day, resulting in blocked pores due to a buildup of dead cells. This process, called retention hyperkeratosis, is at the core of acne and must be interrupted and the cycle must be broken in order to treat acne effectively. Follicular hyperkeratinization (abnormal rapid shedding ) of skin cells within the follicle is a crucial event in the formation of acne.  These dead skin cells build up inside the pore to form a microcomedone, which cannot be seen from the surface of the skin and often occurs 3 months before they surface on the skin.

Another cause of acne is an individual’s sebum or oil production. Sebum production is controlled by hormones like androgens. During puberty, hormonal rises promote enlarged sebaceous glands and increase sebum production which is why acne is the hallmark of adolescence. Rosemary Barclay notes that oil becomes a problem when it’s thicker than it should be, mixing with the dead skin cells to create an even more stubborn buildup and an ideal environment for bacterial growth.  

The last contributor to acne is a specific group of acne-causing bacteria which lives in the skin, called Propionibacterium acnes., commonly called P.acnes. These bacteria have the ability to form biofilms by adhering to the follicle in a complex process. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT explains that while P acne exists in those who do not have acne,  it may be that those who suffer from acne house a genetically different population of this bacteria. These bacteria can survive in environments without oxygen, so deep clogged pores provide the perfect oxygen-free home.  An excessive buildup of oil and sebum provide energy for these bacteria, an ideal growth environment and trigger an immune response that results in inflammation.  Anti-bacterial drug treatment is ineffective in successfully treating acne as the presence of these bacteria alone does not trigger acne.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT  recommends seeking professional advice to diagnose and treat your acne and suggests addressing the root cause, the blocked pores and skin shedding rather than treating the bacterial infection. Diet and certain foods also play a role in aggravating acne, particularly high glycemic index foods.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Her many years of experience have led her to believe in the value of nutritious foods and organic products for good health and good skin. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT. and is the founder of a wellness center. For more information about Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, please visit: www.bonnesantellc.com

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT Lists Makeup Ingredients to Avoid

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT

Your makeup could have pore clogging ingredients that contribute to acne. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT offers a list of comedogenic ingredients to avoid.

Makeup is a great tool for concealing acne, expressing individual style, and highlighting natural features. Many people don’t realize, however, that makeup could actually be making their acne worse by clogging pores or adding unnecessary oils to the skin. Often when acne gets worse, makeup is an obvious choice for concealing it but it creates a vicious cycle that can be difficult to break .

The worst part of all? Many makeup companies mislead the general public about their products by claiming their make-up is oil-free or non-comedogenic. These words don’t actually mean their product won’t cause your skin to break out more, and are used as marketing tactics to sell more products that are deemed as safe and healthy for the skin.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT, owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT recommends checking the ingredients of cosmetic products before using or purchasing to ensure they do not have any pore clogging additives. Many people are very surprised to find these acne causing ingredients in high-end makeup brands. The truth of the matter is, you can find makeup without pore clogging ingredients at high end stores and at drug stores alike.

When beginning your search, Rosemary Barclay warns that ingredient lists can seem very overwhelming at first glance. However, sorting through products to find the right one will do wonders for your skin and personal health in the long run. Rosemary Barclay lists ingredients to avoid in skincare at all costs below.

Algae
Cocos Nucifera oil
Kelp
Lamimaria
Olive Oil
Coconut Oil
Soya Sterol
Carrageenan
Palm Oil
Plankton
Seaweed
Apricot Kernel Oil
Chlorella
Sea Whip
Spirulina
Argan Oil
Isopropyl myristate
Laureth-4
Myristyl myristate
Oleth-3

Since companies often change their formulas, Rosemary Barclay suggests revisiting your product ingredient list every single purchase to keep beautiful, healthy skin. Reintroducing phased out additives will not only bring back unwanted acne, but may cause irritation or redness. Rosemary Barclay recommends consulting the list provided above while shopping for make up.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many faucets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.
She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT Recommends Minimizing Artificial Food Color Consumption for Children

Rosemary Barclay

Dyes have recently been linked to issues with hyperactivity and ADHD. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT recommends minimizing your child’s consumption of potentially harmful dyes, preservatives and additives in foods

The effects of artificial food coloring on behavior in children has been studied for more than 40 years. After reviewing recently published research, Rosemary Barclay, owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, shares her findings on the harmful effects of artificial food coloring on child behavior. These commonly used ingredients are often times not given a second thought by parents, but can have a significant long term negative impact on children with ADHD and hyperactivity. Rosemary Barclay shares her thoughts on the effects of food colorings, dyes and additives and their effects on developing children.

Artificial dyes are added to foods to enhance or maintain their appearance. This could mean brightening existing colors, prevent the loss of colors through elements of transportation and the environment, creating enticing looking beverages, or preserving a products appearance throughout its shelf life. The Food and Drug Administration currently deems nine different artificial colors to be safe but recent concerns have arisen over the use of food colorings and dyes in foods. In 2007, a study conducted in the UK linked the preservative sodium benzoate increased hyperreactivity in children and the European Union required labelling stating that this preservative “may produce an effect on activity and attention in children”.

Two types of artificial food coloring are used, dyes and lakes. Dyes are water-soluble; often found in liquids, granules, or powders. Lakes are not water-soluble; they are found in food products containing fats and oils. Food dye is found in beverages more than any other product, as people often associate a color with a particular flavor. A brightly colored drink can be more appealing and look tastier. Rosemary Barclay urges the general public to stay away from drinks with heavy use of food coloring often found in sodas, sports drinks, and cocktail mixers. These should not be given to children on a daily basis.

Sweets are another hidden source of food coloring, so it might be best to limit that Halloween candy. Rosemary Barclay notes that they can also be found in more unsuspecting sweet sources like cereals, fruit snacks, ice cream, popsicles, icings and even toaster tarts. Try choosing natural breakfast and snack choices like fruit, yogurt, and cottage cheese. Parents should opt for foods that are colored with natural herbs and spices like paprika, tumeric and annatto.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT suggests examining your child’s daily food intake and determine where artificial food coloring can be minimized. Also, research foods that your children like to eat and make substitutions for those foods that contain less food coloring. An example includes swapping GoGurt out for plain yogurt with toppings like honey, smashed fruit, or granola. Completely eliminating artificial food coloring is not an impossible task, buteven minimizing consumption can make a huge difference.

Clearly further research needs to be performed on individual food dyes, preservatives and colorings on the developing brain.To date scientists, consumers and the government have not found conclusive evidence linking dyes to hyperreactivity in children but not enough research has been conducted.

Rosemary Barclay states: “Artificial food coloring needs more research for a definitive conclusion on the effects it has on child development and behavior. However, although limited studies have been done, we have a pretty good idea that artificial food dyes are not nutrients and are not healthy for children and food manufacturers should be required to conduct studies showing safety ”. “These dyes and preservatives may affect a subgroup of children but isn’t the healthier choice just to avoid them altogether?”

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many faucets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.
She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

The Link between Dairy and Acne Explained by Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay

Acne specialist, Rosemary Barclay, believes in a more natural approach to clearing your skin.

Let’s face it – having acne is a terrible experience, especially as an adult. We all want the clear, beautiful skin we see in advertisements, and many people are willing to go to extreme measures to find the skin care routine that works for them. Visits to the dermatologist often result in expensive, harsh prescriptions that leave you with dry skin, chapped lips, or even worse side effects like joint pain! All these concoctions and potions add up fast, and can leave you feeling even more hopeless when the acne remains time and time again.

Rosemary Barclay, owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, Ct., shares a more natural approach to ending the battle with acne – cutting out dairy products. While this may seem like another extreme measure to some, it can be surprisingly easy to adjust your diet. Rosemary Barclay believes that ditching diary can not only reduce acne, but also help you lead a healthier life.

Dairy products that are made from cows often have high levels of hormones in them. Pregnant cows produce more hormones, which cross into the milk and cheese we consume regularly. Even organic products that are labeled as “hormone-free” contain the cow’s natural hormones. Rosemary Barclay notes that the only difference is no artificial hormones are added in addition to what is already there.

Adding unnecessary hormones into your diet can over-stimulate oil glands in the face. All that extra oil can lead to more clogged pores and breakouts. Aside from hormone imbalances, dairy can also cause irritation in the stomach and digestive track. Food sensitivities for internal organs are directly connected to the skin. Traditional Chinese face-mapping techniques can help you figure out potential underlying issues based on where acne is located on the face.

Going to the gym and leading an active lifestyle is another way to lower stress levels, boost circulation, and push out impurities and toxins from the pores. Reaching for whey protein after a successful workout may seem like the healthiest choice, however, this milk-derived powder could actually be a major source of breakouts. Rosemary Barclay suggests cutting whey protein out of your diet and replacing it with a natural plant protein source that can still be just as convenient as whey products.

While cutting dairy is not a guaranteed acne cure for everyone, Rosemary Barclay suggests giving it a shot for at least three weeks to see if there are any noticeable changes or improvements. Tracking food intake is also a great way to narrow in on potential acne triggers. You can cut out one thing, then wait to see what happens when reintroduced. Another way to do this is to cut out everything and eat only vegetables. After three weeks, slowly reintroduce just one thing at a time to document body reactions.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many faucets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT. with her husband Paul and three children. For more information on the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, please visit: www.bonnesantellc.com

Rosemary Barclay - Salt Connected to Acne

Nutrition Specialist, Rosemary Barclay, Explains How Iodized Salt is Connected to Acne

According to Rosemary Barclay, nutrition affects many facets of your well-being including the condition of your skin.

Rosemary Barclay 1
Rosemary Barclay 1

Ingesting certain foods can negatively impact the overall health of your skin, without you even realizing it. These acne-exacerbating foods are common in everyday meals and can be the secret culprit to your skin problems. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., explains how iodized salt, in particular, could pose as troublesome to your complexion.

Iodine in Salt

This mineral isn’t all bad, in fact, we actually need it to function properly! Iodine becomes a problem when ingested in larger than recommended quantities. Rosemary Barclay explains that this excess iodine is excreted through pores and can further irritate sensitive skin and hair follicles, causing an unwanted flare-up of on your face.

Most people get their fully recommended dose of iodine without knowing or trying. However, for those who are already more prone to breakouts, ingesting too much could easily be detrimental to a nice complexion. It’s most commonly found in iodized table salt, so it’s best to check all salt labels before making a purchase. Before making any dietary changes, Rosemary Barclay notes that everyone should first consult their doctor, as some conditions require higher iodine intakes.

 

Iodine in Food

Unfortunately, most restaurants and fast food companies use iodized salt because it’s the least expensive salt option. If you’re going to treat yourself to a night out, Rosemary Barclay recommends choosing grilled options, since fried food items often contain much higher levels of salt.

Just because you’re eating at home, doesn’t mean you’re automatically safe from potentially harmful ingredients. Iodine can also be found in processed foods at the grocery store such as deli meats, canned vegetables, and processed snacks. Seaweed and kelp are also a commonly hidden source of iodine, so enjoying sushi in moderation is key.  Try to consume snacks flavored with sea salt or Celtic salt to reduce flare-ups of acne.

Lastly, it’s no secret that regularly drinking soda is bad for your health. What many people don’t know, however, is the surprising amount of iodine found in deep brown food coloring. If you aren’t ready to kick that soda drinking habit, simply switches to lighter-colored sodas that tend to contain large amounts of iodine.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Her many years of experience have led her to believe in the value of nutritious foods and organic products. For more information on the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, please visit: www.bonnesantellc.com

According to Rosemary Barclay, Those Blackheads Might Actually be Something Else

Rosemary Barclay

Acne specialist, Rosemary Barclay, explains why you might just be wasting your time trying to remove troublesome blackheads for good.

Most people start and end their day in the bathroom with washing their face and peering at their skin. When dark, clogged pores begin to appear, many automatically assume they have a blackhead problem. If you those blackheads magically appear back on your face only a few days after meticulously squeezing and pinching your skin, you might just be seeing sebaceous filaments. Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains how you can tell the difference and strive for healthy skin.

Blackheads

These acne blemishes are a result of oil, dead skin cells, makeup, or bacteria that clog pores. You will be able to feel a slightly elevated bump on your skin. Rosemary Barclay explains that their “black” characteristic is due to oxidation when the contents are exposed to air. To keep these at bay, exfoliate with a natural skincare product free of excess chemicals or irritants which tend to try out skin. Rosemary Barclay believes in using pure, organic ingredients which are free of fillers, alcohol, or artificial fragrances that can do more harm than good.

Sebaceous Filaments

Every human has sebaceous filaments, some are just more visible than others depending on skin type. They are made from sebaceous oil glands which can be found near tiny hair follicles. The oil is impacted into the pores and can be more troublesome for those with an oily complexion or large pores. Rosemary Barclay notes that sebaceous filaments are not acne, but normal build up in the pore around hair.

Sebaceous filaments are naturally a yellow or light grey color when squeezed, and typically have no raised bump, staying even with the skin. When emptied, they tend to fill back up quickly and can even help maintain the moisture balance in skin.

Healthy Skin

It’s possible to minimize the appearance of sebaceous filaments by using exfoliating products, but they will stay with you forever! Your skin naturally produces oil, and can sometimes even produce more if it suspects your skin is too dry.
Rosemary Barclay recommends you avoid picking and squeezing in the mirror, despite the temptation to clear those pores! It’s easy to cause more damage to your skin through scars or broken capillaries. Visit an acne specialist to find the best skincare routine for you.

Rosemary Barclay earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Her many years of experience have led her to believe in nutritious foods and organic products for good health. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT. For more information on the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, please visit: www.bonnesantellc.com

Rosemary Barclay - Stay Flexible During Winter

How to Stay Flexible During Winter With Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Helps You Stay Flexible During Winter

Rosemary Barclay shares tips on how to stay flexible for an improved quality of life.

Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

During the winter months, it’s easy to fall out of healthy routines of exercising and going to the gym. Warm cozy blankets and movies on the couch seem more and more inviting. The holiday season keeps many people busy, and finding the time or motivation to stay active can be a challenge. Falling behind on your fitness goals however, can mean even more work getting back into shape come spring.

Dropping temperatures paired with lack of physical activity can make you tense and rigid. This can lead to a larger risk of getting injured while doing things like shoveling snow, sledding, skiing, or even scraping ice off the windshield. By staying flexible year round, you can stay healthier than ever before this season. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center shares winter wellness tips to help you stay flexible in the winter.

Stretch

Before starting an activity, even one that takes place in the privacy of your home, Rosemary Barclay recommends stretching to warm up. This is key in reducing the risk for injury while improving range of motion. Without stretching muscles shorten and tighten leaving you prone to joint pain, strain and muscle damage. Flexibility will naturally decrease with age but can be improved with regular stretching.

Yoga

Many people shy away from yoga because they believe it requires you to be flexible. Rosemary Barclay knows that this could not be farther from the truth! Poses can be modified for beginners and regular practice will improve both flexibility and strength. Slowly challenge yourself to reach deeper into the position, pulling the muscles and expanding your range of motion.

Pilates

This activity can not only improve flexibility but also posture! Rosemary Barclay recommends incorporating the slow, controlled stretching of Pilates to build long, lean muscles and improve balance. It can also help you strengthen smaller muscle groups that are often forgotten about in gym routines.

Plan with Rosemary Barclay

To help you reach your fitness goals, Rosemary Barclay suggests creating a weekly exercise plan. Put together a schedule with activities and the amount of time each one will take. This will make it much easier to incorporate staying flexible into your daily routine. If possible, encourage your friend or significant other to join you when your schedules line up!

Rosemary Barclay is the owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT.  She earned her bachelor’s degree and Ph.D. in biochemistry and is a board-certified nutrition specialist. Rosemary is also a certified esthetician and acne specialist, believing in the fundamentals of nutrition for overall longevity.   For more information, please visit: https://www.bonnesantellc.com/about-us.html

Rosemary Barclay

How Vegetables Boost Your Immune System and Improve your mood Naturally with Rosemary Barclay

Certified nutrition specialist, Rosemary Barclay, suggests incorporating more vegetables into your diet daily to stay healthy and happy during the winter months.

Believe it or not, a strong immune system starts at home in the kitchen with a balanced diet that incorporates fresh vegetables. Vegetables are packed with essential vitamins and nutrients that fuel the body to help fight off pesky colds. Winter wellness has never been so easy, just add a little extra color to your plate this season! Rosemary Barclayrecommends eating these vegetables to stay healthy and happy during the wintertime.

Vitamin A

This nutrient is stored in your body tissue and is responsible for supporting cell growth and improving immunity. It’s also famously known for its role in developing eyesight. A deficiency can make you more prone to infections, so Rosemary Barclay suggests eating rich leafy greens, carrots, winter squash, and sweet potatoes.

Vitamin C,

The human body cannot store or produce vitamin C so it’s essential to consume it daily. This vitamin is a water soluble that is a potent antioxidant essential for immune function and healthy skin. The hAt the onset of colds and flu, Vitamin C is often the first port of call ! It is not always necessary to take a supplement, as Vitamin C is found quite easily through food. Rosemary Barclay believes in obtaining vitamins from food sources first and supplementing with a slow release Vitamin C supplement if you feel immune compromised or cannot obtain fresh vegetables and fruits. Consuming an adequate daily intake is the best preventative measure against sickness. Luckily, there are plenty of vegetables high in Vitamin C such as broccoli, green and red peppers, brussels sprouts, and cauliflower. Add a few fruits like berries, citrus and kiwi fruit on a daily basis for meet your daily requirement of Vitamin C

Vitamin D

This nutrient is best absorbed through the skin by spending time outside in the sun. In winter months, this can definitely pose a problem! If the cold weather keeps you in, Rosemary Barclay recommends eating more mushrooms, kale, collards, and okra! Vitamin D is a fat soluble vitamin so its a good idea to consume a healthy fat like salmon, tuna , sardines or herring or a small piece of avocado or a few nuts or seeds when eating these vegetables. A deficiency in Vitamin D can be associated with many problems including bone health , autoimmune disease.

Zinc

Zinc is useful for more than just sunscreen! Adding foods like chickpeas, lentils mushrooms,beans , spinach, and asparagus can help boost your immune system and regulate inflammation. Rosemary Barclay notes that zinc is not stored by the body, so maintaining adequate levels is key to staying healthy this winter. Not only does it increase immunity and reduce acne but it can improve your sense of smell and promotes wound healing.

Serotonin Production

During the winter months, your body is exposed to less sunlight; the lowered exposure results in a decline in your body’s serotonin production. Serotonin, the “feel good” chemical, is heavily influenced by vegetables. In order for your brain to produce serotonin, you need to ingest carbohydrates during each meal and vegetables are among the best choices.

Tryptophan is a precursor amino acid that enables our body to create serotonin. The effects of Tryptophan are enhanced when green leafy vegetables are ingested. Vegetables not only improve your immune system, but enhance your mood during the colder months. A happier you, means a healthier you.

Rosemary Barclay is the owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT. She earned her bachelor’s degree and PhD in biochemistry and is a board certified nutrition specialist. Rosemary is also a certified esthetician and acne specialist, believing in the fundamentals of nutrition for overall health and wellbeing.

Rosemary Barclay

3 Reasons Why You Should Use Rosehip Oil with Rosemary Barclay

Board certified nutrition specialist, Rosemary Barclay, explains the benefits of using natural remedies on the skin.

In today’s modern society, many people are concerned with the amount of chemicals and unfamiliar ingredients in popular skin care products. Despite being used for thousands of years, natural oils and plant based products are making a recent comeback in the beauty industry for their results and compatibility with the human body. Ingredients extracted from nuts, seeds, and fruit can nourish the skin naturally without harsh chemicals.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., particularly likes the natural benefits from using rosehip oil. It’s derived from the fruit of a rose bush through a cold-press process. This gentle oil is ideal for all skin types, even for the most sensitive skin. As with any product, it’s always a good idea to test on your forearm before actively applying. Rosemary Barclay shares three reasons to use rosehip oil daily.

Nourishing

Rosehip oil has nourishing benefits, and Rosemary Barclay notes that it is full of vitamins that will improve the complexion. It’ stocked full of essential fatty acids as well as vitamins C, E, & A which encourage collagen production. This can improve softness and assist with skin repair and renewal. It can also help reduce wrinkles, dark spots, and scars, making it extremely popular among celebrities. Only a few drops need to be applied to reap its amazing benefits.

Moisturizing

Unlike many other oils, rosehip oil does not leave a greasy feeling on the skin. It feels rather light on the face and provides long lasting moisture to dry skin. After years of experience, Rosemary Barclay continues to recommend this natural product which is absorbed quickly into the skin and easily added to nighttime skin care routines. After regular use, many report waking up with a brighter, glowing complexion.

Natural

Since sources can vary, Rosemary Barclay recommends finding a high quality product, organic if possible. Look for a liquid that has a deep golden color or a red-orange glow. Avoid yellow and clear rosehip oils which may be heavily processed, losing many natural benefits. Because this oil usually has no added fragrance, colors, or preservatives, it has a very low risk of causing problems or reactions.

Rosemary Barclay earned a bachelor’s degree and PhD in biochemistry. She is a board certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay has conducted in depth research for years, and believes that nutritious foods are fundamental to good health. She created the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT. and actively provides natural and organic services to clients. To learn more, visit: https://www.bonnesantellc.com/about-us.html