Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay - Food Can Change Your Mood – Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme Explains How

Food Can Change Your Mood – Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme Explains How

Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, shares the link between ultra-processed foods, disease, and changes in mood. 

Research has proven that the timeless saying, “you are what you eat,” holds more truth than previously thought. In fact, what you eat impacts the gut biome, a community of bacteria that has been recently shown to play a significant role in the overall well-being of our health. More often than not, mental and physical health issues are closely linked to what we put in our bodies.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains how food choices can positively and negatively impact our moods.

Consuming processed foods often leads to blood sugar fluctuations and nutritional deficiencies such as vital vitamins and minerals . Recent research shows that diet affects gut microbiota, brain wiring and function and oxidative stress leading to cellular damage . Studies have also shown that diets high in natural unprocessed  foods can help prevent depression and obesity. Fruits, vegetables, protein, and good fats are essential to a well-functioning body. On the other hand, Rosemary Barclay explains that poor diets that consist mostly of processed foods and saturated fats can contribute to the risk of depression and illness. A recent study even shows a relationship between manic episodes and the consumption of meats cured with nitrates, like hot dogs and salami.

Processed foods are presented to us in the form of fast food, chicken nuggets, snack foods, and instant meals. Rosemary Barclay notes that the relatively new research on gut health shows links between ultra-processed foods and poor mood. When we interfere with the delicate balance of bacteria in our gut, disease becomes prevalent.

When ailments arise, people often turn to pharmaceuticals instead of looking at their diet. Medication for anxiety, depression, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, and mood swings can often cause additional side effects that negatively impact the body even further. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, recommends seeking the help of a nutritionist first. Making a lifestyle change can be difficult for some; however, it may be possible to cure ailments naturally.  

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

How Diet Impacts Allergies With Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay

Improve your food allergies with Rosemary Barclay’s Natural Enzyme Therapy. 

Nutrition is fundamental for building a strong immune system and healthy digestive system. In fact, diet and lifestyle are related to 80% of human diseases. Our dietary choices significantly improve our overall state of health, and can aid in the prevention and treatment of food allergies. Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains the connection between nutrition and food allergies.

When the immune system reacts to a specific food by creating antibodies  and subsequently releasing inflammatory mediators such as histamine, it is defined as a food allergy. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and include skin rashes, asthma, headaches, mood swings, and heart palpitations. Rosemary Barclay notes that these symptoms generally happen within minutes of ingesting a particular food.

The body attacks the allergen in the same way that it would attack a virus. When the immune system continually reacts to the allergen, the body becomes too depleted to fight real off real germs. Rosemary Barclay explains that long term effects include recurring colds and infections in addition to dark circles under the eyes.

The root cause of food allergies or intolerance is the inability of the pancreas to produce sufficient enzymes to digest these foods . To help combat food allergies, Rosemary Barclay recommends a natural, balanced diet with nutritional enzyme supplements and herbal formulas that are intended to help regulate the digestive system. If there is any damage to the intestine wall, the right diet can help heal the lining and prevent reactions to foods . Natural plant enzymes aid in the digestion of food. When food cannot be adequately digested, nutrients are inefficiently absorbed . 

When the body recognizes nutrients as invaders, the immune system reacts, causing allergic reactions and inflammation. Rosemary Barclay recommends incorporating a nutritional enzyme therapy plan to help the body break down protein allergens and reduce unwanted food allergies. Typically, plant enzyme supplements are needed due to a lack of pancreatic enzymes in the body. While plant enzyme supplements combat food allergies, the body’s own pancreatic enzymes can focus on boosting immunity.

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

3 Quick Steps to More Energy with Rosemary Barclay

It’s easy to naturally boost your life using three lifestyle hacks by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, Ct.

It’s not uncommon for people to reach for coffee in the morning or wish they had time for a mid-afternoon nap. Busy days at work are followed by evenings of preparing dinner and spending time with friends and family. Instead of reaching for energy drinks, supplements, or your third coffee, consider trying natural remedies to boost your energy levels.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers 3 natural suggestions for feeling more energized.

1. Drink More Water

Feeling tired is one of the first signs a person is dehydrated. Drinking more water is the easiest and most common remedy for increasing energy. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT.,notes that women should drink around 9 cups of water per day, while men should drink 13. In addition, eating a variety of fruits and vegetables can play a crucial role in staying hydrated and feeling awake. The more water content a food contains the better it is for you in terms of nutrient density so reach for an orange rather than a snicker bar to keep energy levels up. Low glycemic index fruits offer fiber, phytochemicals and Vitamin C. Nature’s perfect pick-me-up!

2. Exercise

It may seem like an odd notion to expend energy when you feel like you have none. However, even something as simple as taking a brisk walk can naturally boost energy and endorphin levels. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme recommends starting the day with some cardio , weight bearing exercises and stretches instead of relying on coffee to get you through the day.

3. Reduce Stress

When your mind is racing at night, it can be difficult to fall asleep. Lack of sleep contributes to feeling lethargic in the morning and at work. Instead of staring at your phone or thinking about the million different things you have to do tomorrow, try clearing your mind with meditation and deep breathing or just read a book.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme also recommends keeping a journal to reorganize thoughts, goals, and priorities. Journals are not just to do lists but useful for highlighting all the things you are thankful for in life. Try to emphasis things you are thankful for everyday and those that could be improved on. These simple acts can lead to better mental health, positive thinking, and a more restful state of being.

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Mast Cells and Human Lung Health with Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Both a benefit and detriment, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme explains how mast cells operate in the human body.

Mast Cells are part of the human immune system and can be found in tissues and are abundant in skin lung and gut tissues. They play a vital role in our health by helping wounds heal and by protecting our bodies from pathogens. Mast cells play a predominant role in allergies, asthma, and other lung conditions. Additionally, they have been implicated in irritable bowel syndrome and food allergies.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains the importance of mast cells and their role in our bodies.

Chemical mediators like histamine and serotonin, platelet-activating factor and numerous other mediators. These mediators are only released when mast cells are activated or triggered, causing inflammatory allergic reactions like hives, itching, sneezing, and anaphylaxis.

Mast cells are unique depending on which area of the body they come from. Mast cells from the gut are different from mast cells in the lungs. Then, various receptors on mast cells are triggered to signal different responses, resulting in health conditions such as allergic rhinitis, asthma and fibrosis Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme notes that research is still underway to determine how unique molecular environments impact site-specific cells.

Asthma, an inflammatory disease affecting the central airways, can now be widely treated even though the nature of the inflammation is still somewhat unknown. Mast cells also play an important role in respiratory infections, lung fibrosis, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Rosemary Barclay notes that most, if not all, conditions of the respiratory tract can be traced back to mast cells. Studies have shown that mast cell numbers are increased in both allergic and non-allergic asthma. Mast cells contain IgE receptors on their surface and usually degranulate by an antigen-antibody response. Triggers or stimuli do not always involve antigen and in some cases heat or other causes. Scientists have researched mast cell manipulation for many years and drugs like cromolyn and glucocorticoids have shown to stabilize mast cells but for cromolyn, there is no defined mechanism. New opportunities in technological advancements are allowing scientists to study in vitro mast cell systems, which will most likely produce exciting new drug discoveries.

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Nutritionist, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, Lists Foods Cancer Survivors Should Avoid

A nutrient-rich diet paired with exercise can prevent cancer from returning, according to Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme.

Rosemary Barclay After fighting cancer, survivors should pay careful attention to their diet. Studies show that nutrition plays a major role in approximately 30% of cancer cases. Maintaining a healthy weight is the second leading preventable cause of cancer, which means proper diet and exercise is essential at all stages of life. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, Connecticut, explains which foods to eat and which to avoid.

 

Many organic, healthy food choices can reduce the risk of cancer returning. Eating a diet rich in fiber, fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and protein will help keep the weight off while supporting balanced nutrition. Nutritious fats derived from nut butter, avocado, and olive oil should also be added to this diet on a daily basis.

 

Just as some foods are highly recommended for cancer survivors, other foods are largely discouraged. Large quantities of fatty meat and processed meat are associated with a much higher risk of cancer. Rosemary Barclay explains that red meat is defined as beef, goat, lamb, pork, and veal.

 

Processed meats are considered a group 1 carcinogen.  They have been fermented, smoked, or cured for preservation and include popular foods like hot dogs, deli meats, and bacon. This news might be hard to swallow for some people, but Rosemary Barclay suggests replacing them with other options like chicken, turkey, or fish that is freshly cooked. 

 

Cancer survivors should also be wary of another hidden health risk – sugar. Cancer cells usually need sugar to grow and develop. Watch out for products with a high glycemic index such as soda, candy, sports drinks, cereal, and some frozen foods. Rosemary Barclay notes that some foods are marketed as healthy even though they aren’t. It is always recommended to check the ingredients list for preservatives, additives, and total sugar content.

 

Limiting alcohol is perhaps the most important nutritional advice a cancer survivor can take. It is also a source of empty calories, which means it has no nutritional value. These additional calories can contribute to packing on a few extra pounds.

 

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

 

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

Correct Use of Benzoyl Peroxide According to Rosemary Barclay

People don’t often realize which mistakes they’re making when it comes to acne treatment; Rosemary Barclay shares insight. 

Rosemary Barclay 1Benzoyl peroxide is a common medication used to treat combination acne. It works by drying the skin and reducing levels of acne-causing bacteria.

Although this is a standard treatment for acne, most people still misuse it by immediately choosing the highest strength of benzoyl peroxide available.

Doing so will result in unfavorable side effects, the most common one being over-drying the skin which in turn will lead to more sebum production

 Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., explains common problems that occur after opting for high-strength benzoyl peroxide. 

 

Moisturizer

Starting with a high prescription strength strong product right off the bat will cause dehydrated skin which can lead to discomfort and peeling and more oil production. To combat dry skin, a common mistake is to reach for heavy face moisturizers. Rosemary Barclay explains that moisturizers can interfere with the anti-bacterial properties in benzoyl peroxide, making it less effective. It’s important to use moisturizer first and allow it to dry before using benzoyl peroxide as this will compensate for the drying effect of benzoyl peroxide. 

 

Adaptability

By starting at the highest strength of benzoyl peroxide, there is no room to increase the dosage and no time for skin to adapt. Furthermore, acne will adapt to products, meaning products will slowly lose effectiveness over time.  Rosemary Barclay recommends starting at a low dose to avoid extreme discomfort before slowly increasing the dose until the acne clears. Another tip is to use it every other day for a few weeks before using it daily. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme explains that a good starting concentration of benzoyl peroxide is a mild 2.5%.

 

Commitment 

As soon as acne starts to clear or discomfort arises, many people stop following through with their skincare regimen. Rosemary Barclay notes that while it is normal for skin to flake and peel, as benzoyl peroxide exfoliates the inner lining of the pore wall, extreme peeling is not acceptable. When people stop using it after experiencing side effects, it can lead to rampant outbreaks.

 Acne-prone individuals can shed around five layers of dead skin cells per day, which in turn leads to clogged pores and acne outbreaks. Benzoyl peroxide works by bringing dead cells out of clogged pores to the surface. This exfoliation process can look like flaking, but in fact, it is just the pore-clearing itself. 

 

About Rosemary Barclay 

 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals. 

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

3 Cancer-Fighting Foods Recommended by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT recommends natural foods that cancer survivors should incorporate into their diets.

Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

Nutrition directly affects major areas of your life including your health, energy levels, mood, skin, immunity, and general well-being. What you eat is also directly related to your risk of developing diseases like cancer. Certain foods are associated with decreasing cancer growth, while other foods are associated with worsening the risk. For cancer survivors and those in remission, it is essential to know which foods to incorporate into your diet regularly to stay healthy.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, Ct., shares 3 foods for cancer survivors to add to their dinner plates.

Broccoli

This popular green vegetable is in the cruciferous family. Broccoli has been known to contain sulforaphane, which was shown in animal studies to reduce tumor size. Consuming vegetables in the cruciferous family may also be associated with lowering risk for colorectal cancer. Rosemary Barclay suggests adding steamed broccoli to your dinner plate, or eating it raw with dip as a snack. When vegetables are cooked, they do lose a percentage of their nutrients. Try to eat raw fruits and vegetables as much as possible. Cauliflower, cabbage, kale, bok choy and brussel sprouts are also part of the cruciferous family. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests making a slaw of these vegetables to boost immunity and fight free radicals that often lead to cancer production.

Beans

High in fiber, folate, and protein, beans are a delicious source of nutrients. They are made of resistant starch which is not digested in the small intestine but instead used in the colon to make short-chain fatty acids. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT explains that they are also a natural source of antioxidants from a variety of phytochemicals, which has been shown by research to reduce certain types of cancer. Beans, yellow split peas and red lentils or pulses as they are sometimes called, contain lignans and saponins, resistant starches and a different class of antioxidants that are protective against cancer. Use these pulses in soups, chillis or stews to promote protection against cancer.

Berries

This food is high in anthocyanins, a flavonoid with antioxidant properties. It can be found readily in blueberries, raspberries, cranberries, and blackcurrants. Laboratory research has shown that they not only help to treat and prevent cancer, but also slow down aging. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT suggests washing berries very well to remove pesticides and chemicals before adding them into a healthy snack, like plain Greek yogurt. Cancer-fighting berries can also be added to oatmeal and smoothies. Blueberries are particularly high in antioxidant power due to their variety of phytochemicals such as anthocyanins, quercetin, catechins, ellagic acid and resveratrol so its recommended that you consume small amounts daily.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.
She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay - Diet Guide for Cancer Survivors

Rosemary Barclay’s Diet Guide for Cancer Survivors

Making the right food choices can help prevent cancer from returning, explained by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT. 

Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

When treatment for cancer is complete, survivors should be encouraged to make lifestyle changes when it comes to diet as this is an extremely important priority all survivors should consider. Research shows certain foods can not only help with maintaining a healthy weight, but also reduce the risk of cancer recurring. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT,  explains the importance of a nutritious diet for cancer prevention,

Rosemary Barclay notes that is a clear link between being overweight and being more at risk for developing cancer or reoccurring cancer. Data also supports the notion that cardiovascular disease is more common in people who have undergone cancer treatment, which can be heightened by obesity. 

Eating a rich, plant-based diet can help to combat obesity while fighting off cancerous cells. Rosemary Barclay suggests consuming fresh fruits and colorful vegetables, whole grains, and beans. Food sources that are rich in fiber, antioxidants, phytonutrients, vitamins, and unsaturated fatty acids can be preventative. Berries, cruciferous vegetables like broccoli, salmon, and nuts are great foods to incorporate into your diet regularly. In remission, it’s important to eat smaller meals more often particularly if you are not hungry. If you have lost weight after chemotherapy, eat more healthy calories.

Red meat and processed meats should be consumed in small amounts, primarily as they are pro-inflammatory. Saturated fats in the diet are biochemically handled by the body to produce an inflammatory response via the arachidonic acid pathway. Sugars in all forms should be limited as they are non – nutritive and can leave one immune-compromised particularly if you have been on antibiotics. Not surprisingly cereals, frozen entrees, flavored yogurt, granola, sauce, canned soup, juice, soda, and sports drinks are often loaded with hidden sugar. 

Two important factors to consider are firstly consumed your vitamins rather than obtain them via supplements. There is no evidence to suggest that supplements are easily digested or beneficial. Secondly, practice mindful eating. Research has shown that we eat more high-calorie non-nutritive foods while watching television. Always eat at a table and ensure your plate is colorful and contains protein, fats and low glycemic carbohydrates 

 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals. 

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT Explains Microdermabrasion and Natural Peels for Acne

Depending on your acne type, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT explains the benefits of two popular, professional treatments. 

Clearing stubborn acne can take more than store-bought products or treatments. Two very popular options are natural peels and microdermabrasion sessions. Various factors come into play when

Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

choosing which treatment is best for you. Rosemary Barclay, owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., uses her experience to explain the difference between the two. 

 

Natural  Peels

The ability of an exfoliating peel to reach the deeper layers of the skin is a must for acne sufferers as without these peels the dead skin cells will sit on the epidermal layer of the skin, block pores and not allow fresh new skin to rise to the surface.

Peels can range from mild maintenance peels that have no downtime, to more severe peels which can show faster results but may take a week or more to fully heal.

The best formula will usually contain natural acids, which exfoliates dead skin cells and clean out pores. Rosemary Barclay recommends this method first and foremost, as it can be used to treat both inflamed and non-inflamed acne. 

Rosemary Barclay notes that there are additional benefits to chemical peels besides simply exfoliation. They can be used for antibacterial treatment and lightening hyperpigmentation.

Because there are so many different combinations of peel possible, they can really be used to target specific problems based on the ingredients. Many peels on the market are even made of natural ingredients that come from fruit.

While most people have heard of lactic acid and glycolic peels, mandelic acid is relatively new to the skin industry and is naturally derived from bitter almonds.

Mandelic acid’s larger molecules penetrate the skin much more slowly than other peels, making it much more gentle and much less likely to cause skin irritation.

Mandelic acid has natural antibacterial effects, so it can be especially helpful in reducing inflammatory acne. It can also help fade dark marks left by pimples and is thought to have anti-aging benefits.

 

Microdermabrasion

This method uses a mechanical method to more physically remove the outer layer of dead skin. The most commonly used method, known as diamond microdermabrasion, uses an abrasive wand that glides over the skin while sucking up dead skin cells.

Rosemary Barclay recommends using the diamond method over older methods which require aluminum oxide crystals to be sprayed on the face. Microdermabrasion should not be used to treat inflammatory acne but it’s very useful in treating acne scars and hyperpigmentation.

Microdermabrasion is absolutely not recommended for people with combination or inflamed acne type. Rosemary Barclay notes that using abrasive tools on inflammation causes more irritation and additional breakouts. Again, this method should never be used on cysts of any kind.

The treatment is non-invasive, pain-free and requires zero downtime. While clients report that their skin glows and looks younger only after one treatment, long-term results are much more likely when microdermabrasion treatments are completed in a series.

To determine which of these treatments are best for your skin type schedule a complimentary skin consultation at our wellness center. 

 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals. 

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

Treat Non-Inflamed Acne With Tips from Rosemary Barclay

Get rid of your bumpy skin for good using advice from acne specialist Rosemary Barclay.

Sometimes acne lurks underneath the skin and can appear as little bumps, clogged pores, or blackheads. These non-inflamed acne types are typically the result of closed comedones that won’t heal or expel on their own. Comedones do not always progress into inflamed pimples but can remain just under the skin as non-inflamed bumps. For acne prone individuals who shed more dead skin cells than the average, non-inflamed acne can accumulate over time into larger bumps and clogged pores across the face.

Rosemary Barclay, owner and founder of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., understands how frustrating these buildups can be. As a certified acne specialist, she offers advice on skincare products and routines to help you achieve smooth, clear skin.

First, Rosemary Barclay recommends a routine centered on exfoliation. This is due to the fact that non-inflamed acne is mostly a build-up of trapped skin cells and oil inside the pores of the skin. While bacteria can sometimes be present, it is not the main contributor. Exfoliation will help unclog the current buildup by removing dead skin and allowing the trapped contents to rise to the surface. Exfoliants containing mandelic acid and vitamin A are particularly effective in clearing non-inflamed acne

While scrub cleansers are recommended for the treatment of non-inflamed acne , the use of abrasive skin brushes and wash clothes are definitely not. Rosemary Barclay suggests that you steer away from combining rough tools with scrub cleansers as this can lead to sensitivity, hyperpigmentation, and inflammation.

Due to the persistence nature of non-inflamed acne, Rosemary Barclay highly recommends seeing an experienced acne specialist that can administer a series of peels and/or microdermabrasion sessions. Unfortunately, over the counter products alone are not enough to clear and prevent this type of acne. In addition to using stronger products, these blocked comedones need to be extracted carefully to avoid accumulation, which leads to that bumpy skin texture. Rosemary Barclay recommends examining the ingredients of your make -up and hair products too to check for comedogenic ingredients.

By prepping the skin with peels and microdermabrasion, extractions becomes easier since it loosens the clog inside the pore. Rosemary Barclay notes that you should never pick at your face or try to remove clogs with your fingers. This can spread oil and bacteria, not to mention cause unwanted scarring. It is quite common to have both inflamed and non-inflamed acne present at the same time .

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and that it affects many facets of well-being including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives in Old Lyme, CT.