Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Explains the Difference Between Good and Bad Carbohydrates

Certified nutritionist, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains how you can get the most out of your carb intake. 

Despite what many popular dieting fads may say, carbohydrates are an essential component of our diet. They provide energy by converting carbs into blood glucose and energy storage in the form of glycogen for muscle . Certified nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains that a lack of carbs can lead to unfavorable side effects, including fatigue, nausea, and depression.

Eating complex carbohydrates is the key to staying healthy and energized. When food is high in fiber it takes longer to digest before releasing glucose. Complex carbohydrates are often filled with more vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Their slow-release energy will keep you going all day without sugar or mood crashes. This in turn means less of a spike in insulin release and more slow release of insulin. 

The best carbohydrates are derived from simple, natural sources. If your carbs come from a box, chances are it’s not as healthy as vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, also suggests incorporating whole grains, oats, beans, and grains such as quinoa for a healthy diet.

Adversely, simple carbohydrates contain natural sugars that are digested by the body quickly. They cause a spike in energy and sugar levels, followed by a quick decline. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests avoiding processed and refined foods like pastries, white bread, soda, ice cream, and white sugar.  

Simple carbohydrates usually offer little to no nutritional value and can be marketed as healthy options. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, recommends reading the ingredient list of all grocery store products. The fewer ingredients a product has, the better. Packaged, processed foods usually have a long shelf life and contain unhealthy additives such as trans fats, sodium, and refined sugars like high fructose corn syrup.

Identifying bad carbohydrates will allow you to make better choices without giving up foods you love. All carbs are not created equal, so make sure you load up on the right ones!

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. She is the founder and owner of the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, which offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

Certified Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay Recommends Diabetics Eat These Foods

According to Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, people with diabetes can better manage their blood sugar levels by eating certain foods.

Approximately 10% of the adult population in the U.S.are diabetic , and the rate of new diagnoses remains steady. Although diabetes is a serious condition, it is usually manageable with a combination of physical exercise, a nutrient dense diet, and medication. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, recommends a diet of unprocessed foods rich in vegetables, a few fruits and high in  protein with a liberal amount of good fats. 

People with diabetes can still enjoy an occasional treat , but it’s important to track those things and consult with a healthcare professional or nutritionist. High glycemic index carbohydrates can raise blood glucose levels and just as quickly cause them to crash back down. Glycemic index is a measure of the effect of a carbohydrate on blood glucose and diabetics are advised to eat foods with a low glycemic index. Additionally, people with diabetes should try to avoid trans fats.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests eating leafy green vegetables that are packed with vitamins and nutrients. Vegetables such as spinach, kale, cabbage, broccoli, and collard greens have minimal impact on blood sugar levels. The high antioxidant and fiber content also provides excellent health benefits. The high fiber content helps slow down the digestion process keeping blood sugar levels more stable.

Whole grains such as quinoa  are lower on the glycemic index scale compared to white bread and rice. Rosemary Barclay explains that a lower glycemic index means less of an impact on blood sugar levels. High fiber foods slow the release of glucose in the blood so if you are diabetic it’s a good idea to focus on fiber. 

Fatty fish is another great staple in a diabetic’s diet. It provides omega-3 fatty acids that help the heart and brain function properly. Rosemary Barclay notes that polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats can also aid in blood sugar regulation. You can find these healthy fats in salmon, mackerel, sardines, trout, herring, and albacore tuna. Plant-based alternatives include kelp, seaweed, and spirulina.

Beans are an excellent source of plant-based protein and are considered to be complex carbohydrates. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, notes that beans should be used in moderation. Consider trying kidney beans, pinto beans, or black beans for your next meal! They can be added to salads, wraps, and soups in addition to being a plain tasty side. Portion control is advisable for grains and beans as these are carbohydrate dense foods. 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

The Importance of Developmental Nutrition With Rosemary Barclay

Nutrition specialist, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains the value peak nutrition for babies and children.

From the womb through the first year of life, nutrition is essential for human brain development and growth. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains that shortages in nutrients can often cause severe and irreversible effects in developing babies and young children.

Babies lacking intake of iron and iodine, for example, can suffer from cognitive and motor development. Additionally, scientists are finding that DHA, a fatty acid, is vital for the production of neuronal synapses, which aid in the early stages of learning and development. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT notes that other nutrients such as folic acid, choline, and zinc are also linked to brain function and cognitive function.

Nutrients play a very complex role in early brain development. Health complications vary depending on the extent and duration of particular nutrient shortages. Children will need more or less of a nutrient during each stage of brain development. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains that deficiencies can cause a reduction in cell production and affect the size and complexity of cells. Additional, improper nutrient intake can negatively affect the chemical brain process leading to insufficient communication between brain cells.

Children in poor developing countries are most at risk due to food insecurity but surprisingly cases have been noted in the United States as well. Food insecurity is defined as severe hunger or a lack of consistent, healthy foods or a disruption in normal eating patterns due to monetary issues . Low-income families in the United States will often resort to unhealthy processed foods to avoid hunger.

Long term effects of food insecurity can result in low academic achievement, emotional imbalances, obesity, and poor health. Rosemary Barclay notes that children under three are 90 percent more likely to have lifelong poor health, are 30 percent more likely to experience hospital visits, and are 76 percent more likely to have issues in cognitive, behavioral, and language development.

Families who are struggling to provide food for their children should contact local community organizations that can assist. Many churches and non-profits offer assistance as well. Additionally, there are many organizations who offer help and sources of nutrition including WhyHunger?, Feeding America and No Kid Hungry.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT.

Two Natural Supplements for Muscle Gain With Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT.

Achieve optimal performance competitively or in the gym by incorporating two natural supplements recommended by Rosemary Barclay.

Building muscle and creating body definition requires more than just hitting the gym. While lifting weights is a necessary component, the first step to building muscle is adequately fueling the body with the correct balance of macronutrients and vitamins and minerals. Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, Ct., tells clients to start with a clean, healthy diet.

Eating fruits, vegetables, whole-foods, protein, and healthy fats will give your body the nutrition it requires to stay energized and gain muscle. However, many people ask how they can further support muscle growth or reach their goals faster. Not all supplements are synthesized with the same formula, which is why Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT recommends the following natural options.

Protein Powder

The most popular choice among new athletes and seasoned professionals, protein supplements help build new muscle. Whey protein is derived from milk and contains all nine essential amino acids. In addition to building muscle, it can also aid in lowering cholesterol and losing weight but whey is not for those suffering from acne . This heavy molecule actually perpetuates sebum production.

Plant-based protein powders are available for those who have a lactose sensitivity. In some instances, vegan plant proteins even outperform whey by providing probiotics that support gut health. Rosemary Barclay recommends seeing a nutritionist for a custom diet plan that is suited to your individual needs and goals.

Creatine

Found naturally in the body, creatine gives energy to the muscles and tissues. When adding it as a supplement, levels in the body can be boosted up to 40%, promoting muscle gain. Rosemary Barclay notes that creatine can also lead to increased strength. It increases water levels in the muscle signaling growth and remains a safe and effective option for athletes and new gym-goers.

Rosemary Barclay suggests taking the recommended dosages and in proper moderation. Supplements should never be used as a replacement for eating a healthy, balanced diet. In combination with the right diet, organic supplements can boost performance and encourage muscle gain.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Explains Why It’s Healthier to Eat at Home

According to nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT, eating at home is easier on both the wallet and the body. 

After a long day at work, it’s easy to buy take out on the way home. We all know fast food is an unhealthy choice but time constraints and exhaustion force our hand . . Studies have shown that eating out routinely can have serious consequences to our overall health.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains that restaurants often add hidden ingredients to our meals. Sugar and sodium contents are typically much higher than the recommended amounts. When consumed regularly, these foods can become addictive. 

The restaurant industry in the United States is also known for serving unnecessary amounts of food. Rosemary Barclay notes that large portion sizes contribute to our desires to overindulge. Not only are people eating unhealthy foods, but they’re also getting used to feeling extremely full after every meal. Overconsumption of unhealthy food leads to obesity and weight gain. 

Additionally, eating out is usually far more expensive than making home-cooked meals. Budget-friendly food supermarkets can help families prepare more nutritionally balanced meals at a fraction of the cost. It’s important that people do not get caught in the fast-food trap and realize it’s possible to afford other options.

Home-cooked meals are much healthier because we are more conscious of how they’re being made. Rosemary Barclay explains that when we are watching the quantities of each ingredient, we are more likely to make healthier decisions. Additionally, you can have the power to lower fat and sugar alternatives.

Take out foods have additives including monosodium glutamate (MSG), food coloring, sodium nitrate, guar gum, high-fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners, carrageenan, and more. These additives are non nutritive and may have long-term side effects, particularly affecting young children’s cognitive function. Consider cooking a stir fry with fresh vegetables and lean meat or making a salad with leafy greens. Fish is always a quick healthy option too – it can be baking in the oven while you prep the vegetables and can be cooked in 15 minutes -that’s quicker than ordering and picking up take out!!

Eating at home also allows people to enjoy smaller portion sizes. When at a restaurant, Rosemary Barclay explains that people sometimes feel the need to finish eating their entire plate, even if they’re no longer hungry. Eating at home saves you money and provides a more balanced, nutritional diet. Rosemary Barclay recommends seeing a nutritionist if you need help getting started. 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT. 

Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Shares 4 Sneaky Foods that Drain Your Energy

Certified Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT,explains how your diet may be contributing to low energy and lack of focus

Most of us focus on eating food to gain energy but we sometimes forget about the foods that can detract from energy levels . Nutritious, healthy foods can provide plenty of energy to get you through the day. Some foods can leave you feeling sluggish or even more tired than you were before. 

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT,  reveals four foods that steal your energy. 

Cereal 

One bowl of cereal can contain just as much sugar as eating a donut! Although sugar gives you quick energy, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, notes that it leaves just as fast. Once your blood sugar levels spike, your brain becomes less alert. As your blood sugar spikes so does insulin production and it reduces at such a rapid speed that you end up feeling exhausted and low in energy just a couple of hours after consuming this food .  

If you can’t give up your morning cereal, Rosemary Barclay suggests choosing healthier options that contain whole grains and no added sugars. It’s best to stay away from colorful cereals that have artificial flavors and no nutritional value. Try adding fruit and almonds to yogurt instead of eating cereal.

Energy Drinks & Soda

It’s easy to grab an energy drink in the morning before rushing off to work, or a mid-afternoon soda to keep you going. These drinks work by giving your body a caffeine and sugar rush. Again, Rosemary Barclay explains that once the sugar high drops, you’ll quickly feel tired again. Additionally, these drinks can leave you dehydrated. Substitute these drinks for water or naturally flavored waters. 

Alcohol 

Everyone knows that a glass of wine at night will help you relax and get cozy in bed. People fail to realize that alcohol can actually disrupt your sleep and leave you feeling restless. As alcohol is metabolized in the body, adrenaline will increase. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme recommends drinking no alcohol in the four hours leading up to bedtime. Again water should be your main choice of beverage before bedtime. 

White Bread & Bagels 

White  bread is lacks fiber, the body can break it down quickly and use it for immediate energy. White breads and bagels have a high glycemic index and can lead you to crash in the middle of the day. Rosemary Barclay suggests avoiding those bagels in the break room and sticking to whole grains. Oats and naturally sweetened granola are better options. 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT. 

How Diet Impacts Performance in Sport with Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Whether You’re a Professional Athlete, a High School Soccer Player, or a Gym Junkie, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, Explains How Diet is the Foundation for Peak Performance

Fueling your body at appropriate times with nutrient dense foods is fundamental to improved physical performance in sports. There are some notable differences in an athlete’s diet to keep in mind. Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, shares her take on how diet impacts performance in sport.

Athletes who engage in strenuous activity for more than 60 – 90 minutes per day may need to increase their carbohydrate consumption by 65 – 70 percent. Carbohydrates provide the body with its primary energy source. Rosemary Barclay explains that carbs are broken down into glucose (sugar) to be stored in the liver and in muscle tissue.as glycogen. Without appropriate amounts of carbohydrates, an athlete’s performance will be compromised. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, notes that a lack of carbs can also lead to muscle loss. If the body is unable to meet its energy needs, it will break down muscle, which in turn can lead to illness and injury.

To best prepare for performance, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme recommends eating a high-carbohydrate meal three to four hours before activity. Eating large meals too close to performance time can cause discomfort, especially if the meal is high in protein or fat. The right nutritional balance will fuel the body and prepare it for sport.

  • Some athletes respond well to pre-event snacks that are high in carbs such as muffins, fruit, or pasta. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests eating a snack one to two hours beforehand. It is also common to eat a snack during exercise to delay fatigue and top off glucose levels in the blood. Only 30-60 g of carbohydrates are needed mid-event and can be consumed in the form of a sports bar, sandwich, or chocolate milk.Post performance, Rosemary Barclay recommends refueling with a sports drink or banana with peanut butter. The carbohydrate to protein ratio post performance should be 4:1.

Above all, a nutritious and balanced diet is key for optimal sporting performance. Visit your local nutritionist for a diet plan that is tailored to your unique needs.

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay - Food Can Change Your Mood – Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme Explains How

Food Can Change Your Mood – Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme Explains How

Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, shares the link between ultra-processed foods, disease, and changes in mood. 

Research has proven that the timeless saying, “you are what you eat,” holds more truth than previously thought. In fact, what you eat impacts the gut biome, a community of bacteria that has been recently shown to play a significant role in the overall well-being of our health. More often than not, mental and physical health issues are closely linked to what we put in our bodies.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains how food choices can positively and negatively impact our moods.

Consuming processed foods often leads to blood sugar fluctuations and nutritional deficiencies such as vital vitamins and minerals . Recent research shows that diet affects gut microbiota, brain wiring and function and oxidative stress leading to cellular damage . Studies have also shown that diets high in natural unprocessed  foods can help prevent depression and obesity. Fruits, vegetables, protein, and good fats are essential to a well-functioning body. On the other hand, Rosemary Barclay explains that poor diets that consist mostly of processed foods and saturated fats can contribute to the risk of depression and illness. A recent study even shows a relationship between manic episodes and the consumption of meats cured with nitrates, like hot dogs and salami.

Processed foods are presented to us in the form of fast food, chicken nuggets, snack foods, and instant meals. Rosemary Barclay notes that the relatively new research on gut health shows links between ultra-processed foods and poor mood. When we interfere with the delicate balance of bacteria in our gut, disease becomes prevalent.

When ailments arise, people often turn to pharmaceuticals instead of looking at their diet. Medication for anxiety, depression, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease, diabetes, and mood swings can often cause additional side effects that negatively impact the body even further. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, recommends seeking the help of a nutritionist first. Making a lifestyle change can be difficult for some; however, it may be possible to cure ailments naturally.  

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

How Diet Impacts Allergies With Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay

Improve your food allergies with Rosemary Barclay’s Natural Enzyme Therapy. 

Nutrition is fundamental for building a strong immune system and healthy digestive system. In fact, diet and lifestyle are related to 80% of human diseases. Our dietary choices significantly improve our overall state of health, and can aid in the prevention and treatment of food allergies. Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains the connection between nutrition and food allergies.

When the immune system reacts to a specific food by creating antibodies  and subsequently releasing inflammatory mediators such as histamine, it is defined as a food allergy. Symptoms can range from mild to severe and include skin rashes, asthma, headaches, mood swings, and heart palpitations. Rosemary Barclay notes that these symptoms generally happen within minutes of ingesting a particular food.

The body attacks the allergen in the same way that it would attack a virus. When the immune system continually reacts to the allergen, the body becomes too depleted to fight real off real germs. Rosemary Barclay explains that long term effects include recurring colds and infections in addition to dark circles under the eyes.

The root cause of food allergies or intolerance is the inability of the pancreas to produce sufficient enzymes to digest these foods . To help combat food allergies, Rosemary Barclay recommends a natural, balanced diet with nutritional enzyme supplements and herbal formulas that are intended to help regulate the digestive system. If there is any damage to the intestine wall, the right diet can help heal the lining and prevent reactions to foods . Natural plant enzymes aid in the digestion of food. When food cannot be adequately digested, nutrients are inefficiently absorbed . 

When the body recognizes nutrients as invaders, the immune system reacts, causing allergic reactions and inflammation. Rosemary Barclay recommends incorporating a nutritional enzyme therapy plan to help the body break down protein allergens and reduce unwanted food allergies. Typically, plant enzyme supplements are needed due to a lack of pancreatic enzymes in the body. While plant enzyme supplements combat food allergies, the body’s own pancreatic enzymes can focus on boosting immunity.

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

3 Quick Steps to More Energy with Rosemary Barclay

It’s easy to naturally boost your life using three lifestyle hacks by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, Ct.

It’s not uncommon for people to reach for coffee in the morning or wish they had time for a mid-afternoon nap. Busy days at work are followed by evenings of preparing dinner and spending time with friends and family. Instead of reaching for energy drinks, supplements, or your third coffee, consider trying natural remedies to boost your energy levels.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers 3 natural suggestions for feeling more energized.

1. Drink More Water

Feeling tired is one of the first signs a person is dehydrated. Drinking more water is the easiest and most common remedy for increasing energy. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT.,notes that women should drink around 9 cups of water per day, while men should drink 13. In addition, eating a variety of fruits and vegetables can play a crucial role in staying hydrated and feeling awake. The more water content a food contains the better it is for you in terms of nutrient density so reach for an orange rather than a snicker bar to keep energy levels up. Low glycemic index fruits offer fiber, phytochemicals and Vitamin C. Nature’s perfect pick-me-up!

2. Exercise

It may seem like an odd notion to expend energy when you feel like you have none. However, even something as simple as taking a brisk walk can naturally boost energy and endorphin levels. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme recommends starting the day with some cardio , weight bearing exercises and stretches instead of relying on coffee to get you through the day.

3. Reduce Stress

When your mind is racing at night, it can be difficult to fall asleep. Lack of sleep contributes to feeling lethargic in the morning and at work. Instead of staring at your phone or thinking about the million different things you have to do tomorrow, try clearing your mind with meditation and deep breathing or just read a book.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme also recommends keeping a journal to reorganize thoughts, goals, and priorities. Journals are not just to do lists but useful for highlighting all the things you are thankful for in life. Try to emphasis things you are thankful for everyday and those that could be improved on. These simple acts can lead to better mental health, positive thinking, and a more restful state of being.

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.