Rosemary Barclay
Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay’s Nutritional Help for Contact Dermatitis

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, reveals how you can prevent and manage flare-ups through diet. 

It is estimated that over 30 million Americans have a skin condition called eczema, which generally causes dry and itchy rashes on the body. Most people will go through phases of heightened symptoms, called flares, and times of remission where symptoms improve or go away completely. Rosemary Barclay, the founder, and owner of the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains that the condition can be found in many forms, including atopic dermatitis, contact dermatitis, or seborrheic dermatitis.

Although the exact cause is unknown, genetics, environmental factors, and diet are believed to play a role. Rosemary Barclay, a board-certified nutrition specialist in Old Lyme, CT, believes in the power of following nutritious diets explicitly suited for your body and its allergies. When a healthy diet is paired with staying hydrated and drinking water, contact dermatitis flares and symptoms may be reduced. Many people are surprised to hear that their condition can be treated naturally by something as simple as changing their diet.

It is common for people with eczema also to have food allergies, which means the immune system is triggered in response to eating certain foods. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, Ct, recommends getting tested for allergies using a blood and skin test. The blood test checks for antibodies of specific foods, while the skin test introduces small amounts of allergens to the back or forearm. It’s crucial to get this done because, in addition to flare-ups, allergies may cause gastrointestinal issues and shortness of breath.

Another way to test your tolerance of foods is by trying an elimination diet. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests removing a particular food from your diet for a few weeks. Monitor your skin performance during this time, then slowly introduce the food back into your diet. If your flare-up symptoms come back, that food is likely a trigger.

Elimination diets are also an excellent way to identify other conditions you may not have been aware of, such as celiac disease, lactose intolerance, or irritable bowel syndrome. Rosemary Barclay believes everyone should try the elimination diet to understand their body better. Some foods simply make you feel bloated, tired, and unmotivated, while others give you energy and boost your mood!

According to Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, people with skin conditions should focus on a diet that reduces inflammation. Avoid processed foods that are loaded with hydrogenated fats and non-organic sources of meat. Additionally, fill your diet with natural anti-inflammatory foods such as salmon, herring, walnuts, flax seeds, and leafy green vegetables. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., notes that garlic, ginger, and turmeric also hold anti-inflammatory properties.

Many supplements have also been shown to reduce inflammation, including purified fish oil, omega 3s, DHA, and EPA. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., suggests visiting a certified nutrition specialist who can help you decide which supplements to introduce over time. Patients will typically see results at six to eight weeks of a consistent diet plan.

Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Recommends Controlling High Blood Pressure with DASH Diet

Stop Hypertension by using a dietary approach explained by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT.

Pharmaceutical medications prescribed by your doctor can help lower blood pressure, but there are other, more natural approaches available. Rosemary Barclay, the founder, and owner of the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., believes that the DASH diet can offer lifelong treatment for high blood pressure, a condition also known as hypertension. DASH stands for Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, and consists of a plan focused on proper portion sizes and nutritional foods that aid in lowering blood pressure.

According to Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., the DASH diet may be able to reduce your blood pressure significantly within weeks, significantly impacting your overall heart health. In addition to lowering blood pressure, the DASH method can also be used for cancer, diabetes, heart disease, osteoporosis, and stroke prevention.

One key component of the DASH diet is to reduce sodium levels. The standard option allows you to consume up to 2,300 milligrams of sodium per day. The lower sodium option allows for up to 1,500 milligrams per day. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., notes that sodium levels in both programs are lower than what is found in the standard American diet. Consult your doctor to find out what sodium level is appropriate for you.

Rosemary Barclay supports the DASH diet because it is centered around whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and low-fat dairy products. In addition fish, chicken, turkey, nuts, and seeds are good protein sources. The DASH method is low in saturated fat, trans fat, and total fat. Luckily, for those who love sweets and red meat, the diet allows for small increments of each. It’s easier to stick to a diet when you don’t have to give up everything you love entirely!
Overall, the DASH diet calls for 6 to 8 servings of grains per day in addition to 4 to 5 servings of both fruits, vegetables and meats. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., notes that whole grains have more fiber and nutrients than refined grains. Stick to quinoa, wild rice and oat cereals. Vegetables don’t always have to be side items. Consider meatless options or eating a few servings of vegetables over chickpea or lentil noodles for a main course. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., recommends packing freshly cut fruits as a snack paired with a spoon of low-fat yogurt.
Additionally, the DASH diet calls for 2 to 3 servings of dairy, 6 ounces of lean meat, and 2 to 3 servings of fats per day. Rosemary Barclay also recommends incorporating 4 to 5 servings of nuts or seeds per week. Occasional sweets are acceptable as treats although be mindful of the fact that sugar is not a nutrient!

Always consult nutritional advice from a certified health professional.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.
She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT

The Value of a Nutritional Assessment with Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT

Certified nutrition specialist, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, shares the importance of completing a nutrition assessment for better health.

In school, we learn how to read and write, solve complex math problems, and study for tests. People learn about the geography of our earth and how to make friends. Many schools and parents, however, fail to teach their children about nutrition, exercise, and eating healthy. They grow up on diets of fast food and quick meals without any real knowledge of how to properly fuel their bodies.

Other people may know more about nutrition, but do not know how to create a plan or get started. A nutritional assessment is valuable because it gives people a complete picture of their diet and overall wellness. Some patients may have pre-existing conditions that can be alleviated by a better diet. Others seek counsel before severe conditions develop or worsen. Investing in a nutritional assessment is the best way to determine if you are on track for a healthy life.

Rosemary Barclay, the founder, and owner of the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., is a certified nutrition specialist (CNS) with extensive skills in nutrition and nutritional assessments. Rosemary Barclay uses her unique background in research to sort through all the myths and conflicting information out there for clients. She offers accurate information and guidance tailored specifically for her client’s needs.

Studies show that most Americans are deficient in nutrients and vital vitamins and maintain diets that are high in carbohydrates and  fat and sodium. According to Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., the majority of adults lack vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin D, iron, and calcium. Many Americans also have a skewed perception of appropriate portion sizes and calorie content. Leafy greens, fresh fruits, and whole grains are making their way to our plates less and less.

To have a successful nutritional assessment, the client must feel comfortable trusting their CNS with as much dietary information as possible. It would be best if you have  an idea of what you eat regularly and at what times you eat it. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., explains that you will need to build a relationship with your Nutritionist based on trust and mutual understanding. The goal is to help the client discover how to use food and understand what the body needs compared to what it is getting.

Clients will also need to reveal pre-existing conditions and medications to their CNS. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, Ct., explains that some medicines can block the absorption of nutrients in the body. In some cases, immediate vitamin supplementation is needed.

Next, a health plan will be created that is specific to the client’s best interests. Goals will be established and can include losing weight, building muscle, fixing nutritional imbalances, and maintaining good health around conditions or medications. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., believes intervention and goal strategies are unique to the client, which is only possible after building a professional relationship.  

Individual nutritional assessments are far more beneficial than finding random plans online. An assessment identifies how much macronutrients,sodium, omega 3 and saturated fat an individual consumes so it’s beneficial to seek the advice of a certified professional when it comes to your health.

Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Recommends 5 Immune Boosting Supplements for Winter

Build your body’s defenses for flu season by using natural supplements recommended by Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT.

When the holiday season is in full swing, the last thing you need is a cold. Keeping up your regular healthy habits become a challenge but may not be enough to stay healthy this winter. While getting plenty of sleep and exercise will help your immune system stay on track, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT believes there are additional supplements you should add to your diet.

Tea

Sipping green or herbal teas will not only keep you warm this winter but will also give you a nice boost of antioxidants. Rosemary Barclay specifically recommends turmeric and ginger teas for soothing the throat and strengthening the immune system. For added sweetness, consider stirring in some honey. Tea contains flavonoids which are potent antioxidants that protect against free radical damage from chemicals. Recent studies have also shown that tea also produces amino acids called L -Theanine that aid in the fight against infection. 

Elderberry

Natural elderberry extracts have been shown to provide antiviral and pro-immunity effects that support the immune system. There are many products available at natural health food stores, but consumers should be on the lookout for added sugars. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, notes that Elderberry is naturally sweet on its own. Consider making extract at home by simmering dried elderberries in water.

Vitamin D

Those who struggle with respiratory issues may want to ensure adequate Vitamin D blood levels and supplement accordingly. Studies have shown that Vitamin D can help prevent acute respiratory infections. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT notes that Vitamin D pairs well with vitamin K in the body. Consider taking a supplement that has both for an added immune boost.

Pre and Probiotics

Most of the immune system in influenced by the health of the digestive tract. Absorptive function of foods and supplements are influenced by the state of the gut . Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT recommends using both probiotics and probiotics to boost immune health. Probiotics are live bacteria that populate the gut and protect the gut from problematic infections. Probiotics are a food substrate for good bacteria that makes them mutually in the gut. A combination of these help fight off urinary, respiratory and intestinal  tract infections 

 

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, stresses the importance of choosing natural and organic products that have been manufactured correctly. Some cheap products may not provide the benefits they claim or may have added ingredients that are harmful to your health. Always check with a certified nutrition specialist  

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Making Time for a Healthier Lifestyle With Rosemary Barclay

Wellness expert, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, shares five ways to make room on your schedule for a healthier lifestyle.

Not enough time. One of the first excuses people make for failing to maintain a healthy, active lifestyle. You might know exercises to do in the gym, or what to make in the kitchen, yet, nothing has changed. Despite being at higher risk for preventable conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure, among others, people still don’t carve out time for health and fitness. But why?

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT., believes overcoming ingrained habits is the most challenging part of the process. However, once you create and commit to a personal plan, the odds of succeeding increase drastically. Finding even small increments of time will bring you closer to your health and fitness goals.

First, track how you spend your time. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., recommends keeping a journal to monitor what you do and how long it takes you, in real-time. For example, you would document the time spent pushing the snooze button on your alarm (7:00-7:25 am), getting ready for work (7:25-8:00 am), and your morning commute. After a few days of tracking, you might be surprised by how much time you spent scrolling social media, watching Netflix, or sitting on a couch.

Next, practice your time management skills by creating realistic to-do lists every day. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT notes that successful people often have short lists with only their highest priorities. Determine time slots for activities to the best of your ability to make sure you don’t try to overload your schedule. Keep your nutrition and fitness goals at the top of your list each day.

Commit to yourself and the schedule you make. Every day, make a verbal or written promise that encourages you to push through the challenges. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., recommends being clear about why you wanted to make this change and what step you are at in the process. Think about the results, which could include more self-confidence, a longer life to spend time with your family, reduced stress, and a better mood.
Finally, take care of yourself by getting enough sleep at night, drinking plenty of water, and indulging in rewards for your hard work. Treat yourself to 30 minutes of shopping per week or buying a treat not related to food . Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT., stresses the importance of allowing family and friends to go on the journey with you. A strong support system will push you to reach your goals. The biggest change you can make and it’s a simple one is mindful eating and 30 minutes of exercise per day !

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT. believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.
She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Explains the Difference Between Good and Bad Carbohydrates

Certified nutritionist, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains how you can get the most out of your carb intake. 

Despite what many popular dieting fads may say, carbohydrates are an essential component of our diet. They provide energy by converting carbs into blood glucose and energy storage in the form of glycogen for muscle . Certified nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains that a lack of carbs can lead to unfavorable side effects, including fatigue, nausea, and depression.

Eating complex carbohydrates is the key to staying healthy and energized. When food is high in fiber it takes longer to digest before releasing glucose. Complex carbohydrates are often filled with more vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Their slow-release energy will keep you going all day without sugar or mood crashes. This in turn means less of a spike in insulin release and more slow release of insulin. 

The best carbohydrates are derived from simple, natural sources. If your carbs come from a box, chances are it’s not as healthy as vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, also suggests incorporating whole grains, oats, beans, and grains such as quinoa for a healthy diet.

Adversely, simple carbohydrates contain natural sugars that are digested by the body quickly. They cause a spike in energy and sugar levels, followed by a quick decline. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests avoiding processed and refined foods like pastries, white bread, soda, ice cream, and white sugar.  

Simple carbohydrates usually offer little to no nutritional value and can be marketed as healthy options. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, recommends reading the ingredient list of all grocery store products. The fewer ingredients a product has, the better. Packaged, processed foods usually have a long shelf life and contain unhealthy additives such as trans fats, sodium, and refined sugars like high fructose corn syrup.

Identifying bad carbohydrates will allow you to make better choices without giving up foods you love. All carbs are not created equal, so make sure you load up on the right ones!

About Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. She is the founder and owner of the Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, which offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

Certified Nutritionist Rosemary Barclay Recommends Diabetics Eat These Foods

According to Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, people with diabetes can better manage their blood sugar levels by eating certain foods.

Approximately 10% of the adult population in the U.S.are diabetic , and the rate of new diagnoses remains steady. Although diabetes is a serious condition, it is usually manageable with a combination of physical exercise, a nutrient dense diet, and medication. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, recommends a diet of unprocessed foods rich in vegetables, a few fruits and high in  protein with a liberal amount of good fats. 

People with diabetes can still enjoy an occasional treat , but it’s important to track those things and consult with a healthcare professional or nutritionist. High glycemic index carbohydrates can raise blood glucose levels and just as quickly cause them to crash back down. Glycemic index is a measure of the effect of a carbohydrate on blood glucose and diabetics are advised to eat foods with a low glycemic index. Additionally, people with diabetes should try to avoid trans fats.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, suggests eating leafy green vegetables that are packed with vitamins and nutrients. Vegetables such as spinach, kale, cabbage, broccoli, and collard greens have minimal impact on blood sugar levels. The high antioxidant and fiber content also provides excellent health benefits. The high fiber content helps slow down the digestion process keeping blood sugar levels more stable.

Whole grains such as quinoa  are lower on the glycemic index scale compared to white bread and rice. Rosemary Barclay explains that a lower glycemic index means less of an impact on blood sugar levels. High fiber foods slow the release of glucose in the blood so if you are diabetic it’s a good idea to focus on fiber. 

Fatty fish is another great staple in a diabetic’s diet. It provides omega-3 fatty acids that help the heart and brain function properly. Rosemary Barclay notes that polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats can also aid in blood sugar regulation. You can find these healthy fats in salmon, mackerel, sardines, trout, herring, and albacore tuna. Plant-based alternatives include kelp, seaweed, and spirulina.

Beans are an excellent source of plant-based protein and are considered to be complex carbohydrates. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, notes that beans should be used in moderation. Consider trying kidney beans, pinto beans, or black beans for your next meal! They can be added to salads, wraps, and soups in addition to being a plain tasty side. Portion control is advisable for grains and beans as these are carbohydrate dense foods. 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

The Importance of Developmental Nutrition With Rosemary Barclay

Nutrition specialist, Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains the value peak nutrition for babies and children.

From the womb through the first year of life, nutrition is essential for human brain development and growth. Rosemary Barclay, founder, and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains that shortages in nutrients can often cause severe and irreversible effects in developing babies and young children.

Babies lacking intake of iron and iodine, for example, can suffer from cognitive and motor development. Additionally, scientists are finding that DHA, a fatty acid, is vital for the production of neuronal synapses, which aid in the early stages of learning and development. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT notes that other nutrients such as folic acid, choline, and zinc are also linked to brain function and cognitive function.

Nutrients play a very complex role in early brain development. Health complications vary depending on the extent and duration of particular nutrient shortages. Children will need more or less of a nutrient during each stage of brain development. Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT, explains that deficiencies can cause a reduction in cell production and affect the size and complexity of cells. Additional, improper nutrient intake can negatively affect the chemical brain process leading to insufficient communication between brain cells.

Children in poor developing countries are most at risk due to food insecurity but surprisingly cases have been noted in the United States as well. Food insecurity is defined as severe hunger or a lack of consistent, healthy foods or a disruption in normal eating patterns due to monetary issues . Low-income families in the United States will often resort to unhealthy processed foods to avoid hunger.

Long term effects of food insecurity can result in low academic achievement, emotional imbalances, obesity, and poor health. Rosemary Barclay notes that children under three are 90 percent more likely to have lifelong poor health, are 30 percent more likely to experience hospital visits, and are 76 percent more likely to have issues in cognitive, behavioral, and language development.

Families who are struggling to provide food for their children should contact local community organizations that can assist. Many churches and non-profits offer assistance as well. Additionally, there are many organizations who offer help and sources of nutrition including WhyHunger?, Feeding America and No Kid Hungry.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a PhD. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT.

Two Natural Supplements for Muscle Gain With Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT.

Achieve optimal performance competitively or in the gym by incorporating two natural supplements recommended by Rosemary Barclay.

Building muscle and creating body definition requires more than just hitting the gym. While lifting weights is a necessary component, the first step to building muscle is adequately fueling the body with the correct balance of macronutrients and vitamins and minerals. Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, Ct., tells clients to start with a clean, healthy diet.

Eating fruits, vegetables, whole-foods, protein, and healthy fats will give your body the nutrition it requires to stay energized and gain muscle. However, many people ask how they can further support muscle growth or reach their goals faster. Not all supplements are synthesized with the same formula, which is why Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT recommends the following natural options.

Protein Powder

The most popular choice among new athletes and seasoned professionals, protein supplements help build new muscle. Whey protein is derived from milk and contains all nine essential amino acids. In addition to building muscle, it can also aid in lowering cholesterol and losing weight but whey is not for those suffering from acne . This heavy molecule actually perpetuates sebum production.

Plant-based protein powders are available for those who have a lactose sensitivity. In some instances, vegan plant proteins even outperform whey by providing probiotics that support gut health. Rosemary Barclay recommends seeing a nutritionist for a custom diet plan that is suited to your individual needs and goals.

Creatine

Found naturally in the body, creatine gives energy to the muscles and tissues. When adding it as a supplement, levels in the body can be boosted up to 40%, promoting muscle gain. Rosemary Barclay notes that creatine can also lead to increased strength. It increases water levels in the muscle signaling growth and remains a safe and effective option for athletes and new gym-goers.

Rosemary Barclay suggests taking the recommended dosages and in proper moderation. Supplements should never be used as a replacement for eating a healthy, balanced diet. In combination with the right diet, organic supplements can boost performance and encourage muscle gain.

About Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme, CT believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.

Rosemary Barclay

Rosemary Barclay Explains Why It’s Healthier to Eat at Home

According to nutritionist Rosemary Barclay of Old Lyme CT, eating at home is easier on both the wallet and the body. 

After a long day at work, it’s easy to buy take out on the way home. We all know fast food is an unhealthy choice but time constraints and exhaustion force our hand . . Studies have shown that eating out routinely can have serious consequences to our overall health.

Rosemary Barclay, founder and owner of Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, explains that restaurants often add hidden ingredients to our meals. Sugar and sodium contents are typically much higher than the recommended amounts. When consumed regularly, these foods can become addictive. 

The restaurant industry in the United States is also known for serving unnecessary amounts of food. Rosemary Barclay notes that large portion sizes contribute to our desires to overindulge. Not only are people eating unhealthy foods, but they’re also getting used to feeling extremely full after every meal. Overconsumption of unhealthy food leads to obesity and weight gain. 

Additionally, eating out is usually far more expensive than making home-cooked meals. Budget-friendly food supermarkets can help families prepare more nutritionally balanced meals at a fraction of the cost. It’s important that people do not get caught in the fast-food trap and realize it’s possible to afford other options.

Home-cooked meals are much healthier because we are more conscious of how they’re being made. Rosemary Barclay explains that when we are watching the quantities of each ingredient, we are more likely to make healthier decisions. Additionally, you can have the power to lower fat and sugar alternatives.

Take out foods have additives including monosodium glutamate (MSG), food coloring, sodium nitrate, guar gum, high-fructose corn syrup, artificial sweeteners, carrageenan, and more. These additives are non nutritive and may have long-term side effects, particularly affecting young children’s cognitive function. Consider cooking a stir fry with fresh vegetables and lean meat or making a salad with leafy greens. Fish is always a quick healthy option too – it can be baking in the oven while you prep the vegetables and can be cooked in 15 minutes -that’s quicker than ordering and picking up take out!!

Eating at home also allows people to enjoy smaller portion sizes. When at a restaurant, Rosemary Barclay explains that people sometimes feel the need to finish eating their entire plate, even if they’re no longer hungry. Eating at home saves you money and provides a more balanced, nutritional diet. Rosemary Barclay recommends seeing a nutritionist if you need help getting started. 

About Rosemary Barclay 

Rosemary Barclay believes that nutrition is fundamental to good health, and affects many facets of well-being, including the skin, energy, immunity, mood, and performance. The Bonne Santé Wellness Center in Old Lyme, CT, offers solutions to problematic skin without the use of antibiotics or harsh chemicals.

She earned a bachelor’s degree and a Ph.D. in biochemistry in addition to becoming a board-certified nutrition specialist, certified esthetician, and acne specialist. Rosemary Barclay lives with her family in Old Lyme, CT.